Kasten by Veeam and IBM Cloud at KubeCon North America 2021

Transcription is available below video player.

Enterprise Availability with Red Hat OpenShift and Kasten by Veeam (October 13, 2021)

Adam Bergh:

In just a minute here, we're going to be having another session with our key critical partner, IBM and IBM Cloud. Everyone has a chance to win Apple AirTag just by coming and listening to our sessions over here today. And you get entered to win our grand prize. At the end of the day we're giving away some Nintendo Switches and some Oculus 2's. We'll start in just about a minute here. All right, we're going to go ahead and get started. Hi everyone. My name is Adam Bergh. I am with Kasten K10 and I run our technical alliances here at Kasten. We've got a key partner with us today, Mr. Chris Rosen from IBM Cloud. Thank you Chris for being with us today. IBM has been a major partner with Veeam for years, and we're happy to start extending that partnership into Kasten with Kubernetes native data protection on IBM Cloud. We talked about OpenShift today with Chris and without further ado, I'm going to hand the mic over to Mr. Chris Rosen. Chris, take it away.

Chris Rosen:

All right. Thank you, Adam. And thank you to you fine gentlemen for making the first trip out to a face to face event. I know I was really excited about it and after KubeCon Europe, and we had a recap talking about the plan being face to face, I was packing my bag immediately. So what I want to do is kind of talk through a scenario where this is common for my customers. I'm a product manager in IBM Cloud. I own kind of everything, containers and microservices related, in the Cloud. So kind of the plan for the agenda we'll go through a quick use case. Anytime I talk to customers, it's always grounded in a use case. I love technology, but if we're just building widgets to build widgets, it may or may not solve problems.

So we really want to focus on solving those problems. So we'll start with that use case. Then we'll do a quick kind of walkthrough of Red Hat OpenShift on IBM Cloud and kind of go through the scenario that a lot of my customers face where yes, they get started, they deploy their first cluster, it's running workloads, but then the reality starts to set in around challenges with backup, DR, they break something and they're maybe not quite as Cloud native as they would've hoped and fast forward, spoiler alert, our partnership with Kasten and Veeam solves that critical gap.

And yes, the mask is very challenging to talk with. So this use case in the crux of it, it really comes down to innovation where everyone is developing software in some form or fashion, and they need to be able to do so, not only quickly, but also securely. So when we think about it in that context of being able to push the limits and fail fast, but yet recover just as quickly, that's the real challenge in the use case. And there's a lot of offerings that we would kind of try and position in that space, but fundamentally that's what it comes down to. I deploy an OpenShift cluster. I run some workload, someone breaks something. How do we get back to that good state? Whether it's a dev / test cluster or a production workload, the reality is we need to get back to a safe space.

So Red Hat OpenShift on IBM Cloud, if you didn't know, IBM has a Cloud. We've got a lot of services there that are unique and differentiated. In kind of the PaaS portfolio, we've got managed OpenShift. We'll call that for short, where, and you'll see through the walkthrough where we're very focused on simplifying cluster creation, moving up that line of responsibility so our customers can focus on what's important to them because it's not running OpenShift clusters, it's building Cloud native applications, it's modernizing the traditional existing fleet. So we do that by running clusters where we want them building in kind of some of these characteristics. OpenShift is OpenShift and IBM acquired OpenShift because it is that foundational platform that runs consistently on any infrastructure. It's going to give you that same look, feel and capabilities so then the challenge from the IBM Cloud perspective is how do I make OpenShift unique here?

So it's around building in and improving those operational characteristics that allow us to provide a 99.99% SLA, to put additional security and controls around it. Things like every Cloud provider has a key management system that basically they have a policy assurance that they're not going to access your apps and your data. Only in IBM Cloud with our crypto services, which is what we call "keep your own key," is there a technical assurance that we don't have access to your applications or your data. So think about this secure enclave around all of your apps that IBM developers, our support, our SREs do not have access to that data.

So let's kind of walk through the scenario of what a general customer journey looks like and how they get started. So the first thing I come to the IBM Cloud dashboard, and I look on the catalog. I search for containers. I see things if I want a Kubernetes cluster or do I want an OpenShift cluster? Once I select that, now we've got a couple things. We can do it manually and set up that cluster, which we'll walk through here. Or we also have this more of an opinionated cluster deployment, where if you want this secure by default, where it's air gapped, we're integrating with monitor logging, activity tracker, key management, all out of the box. But for this example, we'll just do the manual deployment. We pick our OpenShift version, we support the extended support, just like Red Hat. So [inaudible ] we'll get you to 4 .0. In this example, we're using 4 7.

So then I choose the infrastructure that I want to run in; virtual private Cloud, IBM Cloud satellite. So this is where we're extending fully managed services outside of the confines of infrastructure that IBM owns. Maybe you want to manage OpenShift cluster in your data center, in the edge, in your retail store, maybe even another public Cloud provider like AWS, Amazon, or, yeah, that's one and the same, Azure or Google. We can provide managed services in that infrastructure so that way your OpenShift cluster is in proximity to other resources that you may have deployed. Here with the multi-zone cluster, where again, that's how we get that 99.99% SLA, is distributing masters and workers across three physically separate data centers, again, raising the line of responsibility so you focus on those apps. So then we pick the flavor, which is kind of our T shirt size. How much resource do you want?

And you can swing and miss, have too much, have too little and then deploy additional worker pools to kind of right size what you need even including bare metal nodes if you need that as a part of the managed service. I could change the name. By default we're using LUKS encryption on the container disk, private or public endpoints. So this comes down to again, do I want front side network connectivity or not? And then lastly, do I actually have the right permissions to deploy this thing? So maybe I invited you to my account and I'm not a good administrator so I gave you the wrong permissions. We'll let you know right out of the box. Here's kind of a look. If I wanted to go in and change the flavors, I can go in and do that again, including bare metal.

So now again, in our story, think about innovation. Someone has created this cluster for me, we have it up and running. Here's my kind of overview of all the clusters that I have running in my account. When I go into a specific cluster, now I get additional details. Right across the top we're going to give you all of the health around that cluster. It's all green, so I'm happy. If something were broken, it'd be red and be glaring immediately, or send you an alert when those things happen. But here, you can see all the pertinent information around the cluster and its contents, including down here at the bottom, these integrations. So this is where again, OpenShift becomes more than OpenShift where you could run EFK and Prometheus in your cluster. But the reality is no one wants to do that. Let's move up that line of responsibility and use a managed monitoring and logging solution.

In context, I can launch out to my logging in this example, or my monitoring service and dig into that particular cluster. Now you think logs, that's not very... That's kind of ugly, but I can use my natural language to search for a particular timeframe and say, well, there's an error about five hours ago, and it'll take me in context of that line. And I'm not a developer. I can't solve the problem, but I can give that to the right squad and have them solve it. So now when I deploy a workload... So now clusters running, I'm a developer, I'm a team. I'm starting to deploy content. So in this example, I grabbed one of our Cloud Paks. This is about IBM software really modernizing to a cloud native approach. I can deploy that to my existing cluster. Yep. I want to deploy this particular Cloud Pak. And so now at this point in the journey, I have my cluster deployed.

I've got my very critical Cloud Pak for business applications up and running. I've got this pristine environment that I want to keep safe. Fast forward, I'm not going to give you the whole K10 rundown because if you've been here at the booth at all today, you've already heard this. But this is again, the foundation to our partnership with Kasten by Veeam, is to bring these capabilities into IBM Cloud. So as you're running the Kubernetes or OpenShift clusters and that critical workload, including Cloud Pak for business automation. In this example, I can deploy it and have that resiliency, either built into my CI/CD pipeline, or once that workload is up and operational. You can see here that we have a tile in the catalog, that same catalog where I deployed my OpenShift cluster. I could come in, search for Kasten, and I can see the tile here where I'm going to come in and deploy that instance into that particular cluster.

So the same kind of look and feel that I just talked through with deploying IBM content, we can deploy Kasten into that cluster as well. Where do I actually want to deploy it? And then after that, it's the same look and feel. So when we think about consistent user experience, maybe you're using Kasten in another cloud or on-prem today. We're not going to make Kasten something that it's not. It's going to give you the same features and capabilities in IBM Cloud that you can get everywhere else. So when you choose to run Kasten on top of your Kubernetes or OpenShift cluster and IBM Cloud, again, it's that same feature set, the same ability to either back up or have the disaster recovery, or again, integrate that to my DevOps pipeline.

And then the last one here is around again, expanding on that integration where it's the same Kasten K10 capabilities but now we're just using that in a different source, a different managed from type cluster. So with that, I think I kept us on target. I know everyone's very interested in a prize. I'd like to thank you for your time. If you have questions for me on the IBM Cloud side, my email and my Twitter are here.

Adam Bergh:

I think we do have a few minutes. Does anyone have any questions? Are there questions for Chris? Okay with that? Let's see. I'll take the mic. Thank you, Chris. Thank you to IBM. Thank you for the partnership and with that, we're going to do a little bit of a raffle here. Thank you for sticking around. I'm going to pull out our winner here for our Apple AirTag. Again, everyone is entered to win our grand prizes, which will be given away this evening. Last three numbers 017, 017. We have a winner, Shay. Thank you guys for attending. Again, you can stick around for the next session. You have another chance to win. Every session here at the Kasten theater has a chance to win an Apple AirTag. Thanks, Chris.

Chris Rosen:

Yes, sir. Thank you.

Adam Bergh:

That was appreciated. That was really great. I really appreciate you guys doing that. The partnerships and we look forward to building this thing up over the next couple months, even as a jump off point.

Chris Rosen:

Absolutely.

Adam Bergh:

To start really, really [inaudible]. I'm sorry.

Speaker 3:

I thought you were Israeli, but I was wrong.

Adam Bergh:

No we're not Israeli.

Speaker 3:

Because of your name.

Adam Bergh:

Oh, okay.

Speaker 3:

You say Shay, I understand you or not.

Adam Bergh:

Oh, is it? Am I saying it wrong?

Speaker 3:

It's written wrong. It's "Shy."

Adam Bergh:

Oh Shay. Okay. Yeah. It'll work on premise. Absolutely. So any Kubernetes distribution [inaudible].

Speaker 4:

Hi, I'm Joey.

Chris Rosen:

Hi Joey. How are you?

Speaker 5:

Oh very good. [Crosstalk]. Okay. IBM is a slow moving process machine sometimes, but we're getting there so... Okay. I'll be glad to hear that we're not the only slow process enriched place but... What time is it? Okay. Very good. All right. Well thank you.